Building stronger relationships between parents and kids – The Morning Thing 4/18/17

build-relationship-with-your-child

Today, The Morning Thing focused on the relationship between parents and kids.

We shared some wonderful insight from Focus on the Family on how to build healthy relationships with your kids. Click HERE to read the full article.

Pray, pray, pray – don’t make this a last resort, make it part of your routine.
1 Thessalonians 5:16-18 (NIV)
16 Rejoice always, 17 pray continually, 18 give thanks in all circumstances;for this is God’s will for you in Christ Jesus.

Get into their space.
From infancy through about age 8, kids spend a lot of time on the floor. We should be down there, too — playing games, pretending with dolls, building block forts. Fight the feeling that you’re acting stupid; crawl through those embarrassed feelings and meet your kids.

Keep it real.
As hard as it may be, recounting our missteps can help kids who are 12 and older learn from our errors. They also get to see we’re not perfect.

Enjoy family time.
A simple way to connect with your kids is eating together as a family. This is easy to do when they’re little, but as kids get older, sports and other activities compete with the family mealtime.

Do projects together.
You’ll need to think and pray about the right level of involvement for your children based on their ages and experience. Count on this: The project may take longer, and your children will not do things like you would. If you can accept these facts, you’ll discover an endearing, enjoyable time.

Be silly.
This isn’t just for small ones. Older kids like it when you act silly, too — even though you might hear, “Oh, Dad, stop it” or “This person is not my mother.”

Embarrassing children in public is not a good idea, but having fun in private keeps things light and makes you approachable. So go ahead, do the goofy dance, make funny faces, sing silly songs, talk for the dog.
We also shared 20 ingenious tricks on how to get your kids to open up about their school day. Click HERE to read the full article from www.sheknows.com

Here are 10 of the tricks:

  1. Tell me about today’s “thorn” (a not-great thing that happened) at school.
  2. Now tell me about the “rose” (the best thing that happened).
  3. Did anyone say something funny or tell a good joke?
  4. Was it a “play with your friends at recess” kind of day? Or a “chill by yourself on the swings” kind of day?
  5. You had art/music/computer today, right? What kind of project are you working on?
  6. Tell me something that you learned today that I don’t know. If you can stump me, I’ll do a goofy dance/read to you for an extra 10 minutes/watch an entire YouTube video with you (insert whatever works here).
  7. Tell me something kind that you did for someone today.
  8. Tell me something kind that someone else did for you.
  9. How many stars would you give the cafeteria food today?
  10. Did your friends get along really well today?

(Picture from Focus on the Family and Ingram Publishing/Thinkstock)